Beings of Power: Mooros

Mooros is one of the Oyarsa. Player clerics can choose him to gain access to the Light domain.

Mooros is a big part of Felmoor, and this quick  introduction doesn’t really do him justice, BUT we’re starting the campaign on SAT and I’m kindof  rushing to get as much down on paper as possible.

Mooros the One-eyed, the Giant King, Lord of Earth 

Relationship with Followers
Mooros is an active and visible force in the world. It is an unusual individual who has not heard one or two of the many stories told about him. His largely benevolent interactions with the planestrange. Those who come face to face with the Lord of Earth encounter both his humor, and his austerity: two enduring qualities which his personality unites in a way that only an immortal nature could.

Teachings & Philosophy
Mooros the one-eyed is associated with wisdom. It is said that He can always see through Svjart’s disguises. Mooros teaches strength, responsibility and honor, but above all else, truth. His followers are expected to meditate in order to uncover the deepest thoughts and motivations of their own heart. He will not tolerate selfishness or evil intent among his followers.

Notes
In power and in wisdom, Mooros is the greatest of the Oyarsa. In Felmoor, his influence and voice ring loudest through the bones of the earth. Following the fracture, Mooros stood between the world and complete destruction. In those early centuries, he did his work well; shoring up the broken, jagged pieces of the world, mending the walls of reality and putting distance between Felmoor and the encroaching void. Now, Sohmna has taken over much of his work, and Mooros is engaged in other tasks. He wars with the fiend-queen Tishma in the lowest bowels of Felmoor where the earth is thin and the void seeps through the fissures in the floor of the world.

He is depicted as a giant with broad shoulders and enormous hands, wreathed in white fire.

Clerics in Felmoor

One of my favorite roleplaying podcasts, “Game Master’s Journey,” has been recording a series of episodes about the relative unpopularity of the cleric class, and how GMs can make clerics more enjoyable to play. They’ve echoed some of my own observations, and helped me think a little more clearly about what I wanted to accomplish when I created my own pantheon.

I think roleplaying works best when players feel that they have at least a minimum of orientation towards the world before they begin playing. Certainly, for me, I have never felt attracted towards a cleric or warlock character for that reason. D&D is fairly vague and careless in it’s attitude towards religion, deities, and the way that those concepts interact with the world and it’s inhabitants. Both the cleric and the warlock are conceptually dependent on a defining relationship with a supernatural world that is not clearly drawn.

In list form, here are some of the questions I thought it was pretty important to answer, and the answers:

Continue reading “Clerics in Felmoor”

Player Character Race: Half-Dwarves

Along with Human, Half-Dwarves are a really simple option. They take their flaw from humans, and their perk from the dwarves.

Half-Dwarves

Size: More or less human-sized.
Speed: 30ft.

Most half-dwarves are slightly on the shorter side, but like most folk, they are a diverse bunch. It is not uncommon for a half-dwarf to grow taller than a human. They are known for a tendency to grow into extremely tough, strong-willed individuals, and there are many legends told of half-dwarves who withstood an astonishing amount of punishment.

Max ability scores
STR DEX CON WIS INT CHR
22 18 22 20 18 20

Perk: Stone in the blood
At level 1, Half-dwarves gain a +1 bonus to AC. They gain an additional +1 bonus at levels 10 and 20.

Flaw: Broken spirit
The race of man was at the epicenter of the fracture, and they are still suffering the effects. Half-dwarves inherit this penalty and suffer a -1 penalty on all saving throws Vs. Magic.

Skill: An unknown destiny
1 free proficiency or feat or language.

Designing new PC races

 

I gave myself some guidelines for new PC races.

  • 1 big perk that grows over time and also 1 big static flaw
  • 1 or more roleplaying trait (should not be significantly + or – gameplay-wise.)
  • 1 free proficiency OR a + modifier bonus in restricted situations
  • Max ability scores adjusted up or down no more than 4 for zero net change
  • Optionally, ability score bonuses and penalties for zero net change.

I thought it was silly that in Vanilla D&D all the races have the same maximum stats. Ability scores range from 0-20. A value of 10 represents “the normal human average.” To put things into perspective, the 5E player’s handbook says “A score of 18 is the highest that a person usually reaches. Adventurers can have scores as high as 20.” Take the STR score, for example. A value of 20 is 2 points higher than most humans could ever reach, representing, maybe, an olympic weight lifting gold-medalist. Now imagine, if you will,  a 3ft-tall gnome going up against Mario Martinez in the clean and jerk. You think that gnome is going to be lifting 15 or more times it’s own body-weight? It’s a little bit silly. And yet… it is a fantasy game. I hate to use the word realism in this context, for obvious reasons, but I just think that we can do better.

There’s another reason to fiddle with Max ability scores. It creates races that offer a degree of specialization. Lots of classes have dump stats; ability scores that are simply not very consequential to their play-style. In Felmoor, I want to give players (who, like me,  might be just a tiny bit OCD about their character sheets) the opportunity to be less well-rounded in return for having a statistical profile that is tighter,  more focused on specific aspects of play. Players should be able to make interesting and consequential choices  with all their character’s abilities, and specialization is a way to turn what would normally be an unimportant stat into an opportunity. Let’s say you want to be a sneaky ranger who likes to engage bad guys from a distance, or not at all. Be a Quyg! You’ll sacrifice some room for growth in strength and constitution, but you’ll  eventually be sneakier and cleverer than anyone else, guaranteed. Do you want to be a bard but think that wisdom is overrated? Be a Ramaki! You’ll have a lower cap on wisdom, but you’re sure to be the life of the party.

The Beginning

snorri_sturluson
Snorri snoring.

Before we do anything else, we should know what kind of world this is going to be, in the broadest sense, right? Where does it come from? To get a sense of history and form some idea about what the future might look like, it seems logical to go the beginning of relevant developments.  For Felmoor, we go all the way back to the literal beginning of the world, which depending on how you look at it, is also the end of the world.

I came up with the basic idea for Felmoor back in highschool. It was called Telmor back then. I was super into Beowulf, and I’d been reading Snorri Sturluson’s Prose Edda so there was some Norse myth bouncing around in my head. The big influence, though,  was “The Silmarillion” and what emerged was in some ways an intentional imitation of Tolkien’s account of the creation of the Midgard. Felmoor is a little bit different, a little more modern, but it’s got a similar profile.

The creation narrative below the jump is eventually going to be part of a “Player’s Overview.” The overview won’t be exactly analogous to the “Player Handbook” for vanilla D&D. It’s intended to be the bare minimum of lore, geography, etc. that players new to the setting need to know before playing. This is just a draft. The final product should probably be a lot shorter, and go into less detail.

Continue reading “The Beginning”

Felmoor

Hi! I’m almost brand-new to pen-n-paper roleplaying, but I’ve decided to write a Dungeons and Dragons fifth edition campaign setting, and sort-of concurrently, an actual campaign. Crazy! Yes, I know, but what the heck. I’m having fun, I’m learning stuff, and you might learn something too.

I’m calling it Felmoor. I’ll be posting new stuff as I write it, and I’ll also share some of the tools and resources I find. If you’re interested in DMing, Roleplaying, or even just world-building I hope you’ll enjoy following along. I’d love to hear from you in the comments. Feel free to educate me if you know more about this stuff than I do (you probably do!)