Player Character Race: Humans

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“Hoomun”

Humans should be really basic and open-ended, and I think that’s what I’ve ended up with.  It makes sense to offer at least one choice that represents a very well-rounded,  middle-of-the-road type of character.

I gave some thought to letting them just be a blank slate, but in the end I couldn’t let Felmoorish humans go without something that sets them apart from other fantasy humans: something unique and appropriate to the specific world they live in. So, they do have a lore-appropriate perk and a lore-appropriate flaw. Humans are planestrange, like the Ramaki, and most of what makes them unique stems from that.

Humans have a perk that lets them ignore material components for spellcasting, like the Mountain Quyg; just another way players can work around those rules if they choose to.

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Player Character Race: Ramaki

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Tieflings are the closest analogue for the Ramaki in vanilla D&D. They’re both charisma-based races with miscellaneous magical advantages.

The Ramaki are the second planestrange race, along with the humans; that’s just a way of saying that they don’t belong in Felmoor, they fell from the sky during the upheaval of the fracture. While humans are nominally associated with Ull, the Ramaki come from – unsurprisingly – Rama, the celestial plane.

From a mechanical standpoint, the Ramaki are pretty flexible, but slightly prejudiced towards spellcasting/ranged roles. They have the potential to develop into really great bards or sorcerers thanks to their high charisma cap, but there’s nothing in their design that pushes them in that direction from the start They don’t come with any ability score bonuses or penalties at all.

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Yvain, from “Stardust” was pretty much a Ramaki.

 

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